TOP TEN ENDANGERED PROPERTIES LIST OF METRO LOUISVILLE

The “Endangered Properties” list was produced by the Louisville Historical League in 1999. Prior to this time, the former Preservation Alliance (PA) organization publicized this list. When PA went out of existence, the League took over this valuable program of highlighting historic properties that were being considered for demolition or were in danger of severe deterioration. In 2009, this list was prepared by Preservation Louisville. However, since that organization now no longer exists, the League, in partnership with Neighborhood Preservation and Planning (NPP), this list is being renewed and released. 

Unlike other “Endangered Lists”, this list does not have a new listing of properties each year. Once placed on this list, properties are not removed until a final resolution has been determined. 

How the list is determined:

 The criteria used to determine if a property is added to this list is as follows:

1. Must be on the National Register of Historic Places or be eligible

2. Must be within the metro Louisville region (Jefferson County; Floyd and Clark counties of southern Indiana)

3. Must be in imminent threat of demolition or in severely deteriorated condition.

The League and NPP takes great pride in this effort to preserve the cultural and historic heritage of the Louisville metro region.


Scroll down to view  the 2020 Ten Most Endangered Properties in Metro Louisville:

Top Ten ENDANGERED PROPERTIES LIST OF METRO LOUISVILLE

Samuel Plato House

Samuel Plato House

Samuel Plato House

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                   2509 West Muhammad Ali Blvd.                                               Designed by Samuel Plato, this was his home with his wife Elnora. The house is currently owned by an out of town person who rents the house. The house needs significant maintenance. 

Old U of L Dental Building

Samuel Plato House

Samuel Plato House

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NWC of Broadway & Brook Street  

Once the academic training for many Louisville dentists, this building has been vacant for many years and slowly deteriorating by neglect. It is owned by the University of Louisville. U of L has issued several RFPs for its sale and renovation, but has not accepted any of the offers received. Several developers are interested in purchasing and repurposing the building but U of L will not sell. Instead, U of L is considering demolishing the building. 

Old Highlands Hospital / Urban Gov't Center

Samuel Plato House

Old Highlands Hospital / Urban Gov't Center

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Barret and Breckinridge Streets  

This property has been vacant for many years. It previously housed the Urban Government Center. It was to be redeveloped with the main building being demolished. This proposal has since been withdrawn. A new RFP is being prepared. Several developers are interested in this property and one definitely wants to save the building and repurpose it. 

Nieghborhood Contextual Buildings

Nieghborhood Contextual Buildings

Old Highlands Hospital / Urban Gov't Center

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  West Market Street in Portland

On a regular basis, streetscape buildings are being demolished. While not architecturally decorated, they are important building blocks for their surrounding neighborhoods. As they are razed for vacant lots, the urban fabric is diminished and redevelopment of these districts becomes more challenging. Renovation is the best solution for these contextual structures that should be the foundation for their neighborhoods revitalization.

John B. Castleman Statue

Nieghborhood Contextual Buildings

John B. Castleman Statue

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Cherokee Road & Cherokee Parkway 

This landmark has stood in Cherokee Triangle for over 100 years without controversy. Then, a group used misrepresentations to allege Castleman was a racist, bigot, and traitor – none of which was true in fact. Mayor Fischer sided with this mis-informed group and ordered the statue to be removed. The organization ‘Friends of Louisville Public Art’ (FOLPA) has filed suit to prevent its removal. Once the legal case is resolved will determine the fate of this statue.   

Paget House

Nieghborhood Contextual Buildings

John B. Castleman Statue

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 Dock View Drive off of River Road 

Vacant for many years, the Paget House is one of Louisville’s oldest buildings. It is believed one part of the house was built in the 1780s. The main part of the house was built in 1838. The house was once owned by Margaret Wright Paget, who was related to George Washington. The house is currently owned by the developer of the adjacent residential complex and who has pledged to renovate it, but thus far no signs of such repurposing. 

Top Ten Endangered List

Worship Houses that are vacant

Worship Houses that are vacant

Worship Houses that are vacant

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Quin Chapel, etc. 

With declining congregations, several churches are being abandoned and sold or neglected, which could result in demolition. A good example was the former Jewish synagogue on Dutchmans Lane that has since been razed. The former Quinn Chapel at Ninth and Chestnut has been vacant for decades while various renovation attempts have been delayed. Louisville has many successful repurposing of churches such as the former Marcus Lindsey Church at Shelby and East Main. 

Peter Doerhoefer House

Worship Houses that are vacant

Worship Houses that are vacant

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 4430 West Broadway

Peter Doerhoefer was the son of Basil Doerhoefer. Basil was president of National Tobacco Company, which at one time one of the largest tobacco companies in the country. Peter’s house is just to the east of Basil’s more prominent house. It is owned by the same organization that owns Basil’s house. It has significantly deteriorated and becoming very difficult to renovate.

Lemon &Sons Jewelers / Henry Vogt House

Lemon &Sons Jewelers / Henry Vogt House

Lemon &Sons Jewelers / Henry Vogt House

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Northside of Broadway between Brook and Floyd

 This historic location once was the home to industrialist Henry Vogt and then it was expanded for Lemon & Sons Jewelers who created the Kentucky Derby trophy for decades. It is now owned by Norton Healthcare. As of now, it is not threatened, but a nearby $80 million hotel development could damage it.  

Odd Fellows Hall

Lemon &Sons Jewelers / Henry Vogt House

Lemon &Sons Jewelers / Henry Vogt House

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 This building, built about 1898, was originally known as Liberty Hall and served as the Odd Fellows fraternal organization’s meeting hall. By 1963, it was known as the Tavern Club. Until recently, it has been occupied. And, it has a distinctive front façade. The building is structurally sound and has been maintained with no significant signs of deterioration. It is owned by Omni Hotel which wants to demolish it.